Michael Alig’s mom at war with Club Kids over his ashes

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Even after his death, Michael Alig continues on as he lived: in a swirl of chaos and discord.

Page Six has learned that there’s an ugly battle over his ashes, with the last of his Club Kid disciples at war with his mom over his final resting place.

One of the Club Kid Killer’s most loyal supporters — and original Club Kid — Rachael Cain organized a GoFundMe in hopes that they would be able to install Alig’s ashes at Brooklyn’s famed Green-Wood cemetery, alongside (as they see it) other iconic New York cultural figures like tragic artist Jean-Michel Basquiat.

Alig’s mom, Elke, allegedly agreed to split the ashes with them, so half could go to Green-Wood and half could come back home to Indiana with her, according to insiders.

But rumors swirled among the Club Kids that she’d decided to take his body back to their native South Bend, Indiana, instead and leave them with no remains, sparking some of them to dub her “selfish.” And when Elke caught wind that they were smearing her name to reporters, she allegedly threatened to back out of the macabre deal.

“His mom just doesn’t get it, and is going to take his body and put [his ashes] by her bed on the nightstand. Michael Alig doesn’t want to go [back to Indiana] at all,” Alig’s Club Kid successor Jason Chaos told us.

Alig — who was jailed in 1997 for the brutal killing of Club Kid Angel Melendez and died on Christmas Eve from an apparent heroin overdose — is scheduled to be cremated on Thursday. Aja Worthy-Davis, a spokesperson for the New York City medical examiner’s office, told us his cause of death is still pending at this time.

“Regardless of what decision is made, everything is ready for Michael. Everything has been paid for. We are still determing a future memorial service in New York if there is money left, we will do something. The final resting place in Green-Wood is paid for completely. It’s now in her hands,” Cain said.

Before his conviction, Alig was the ringleader of the Club Kid youth movement, based around a number of Manhattan nightclubs in the late 1980s and early ’90s.

We reached out to Elke for comment.

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